News from The SHEXpats

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Shout-Out – November 21, 2014

 

President Xi Jinping is pictured here receiving a hongi, or traditional Maori welcome, from Lewis Moeau, a Maori elder in New Zealand.  Xi has visited both Australia and New Zealand over the last few days; China and Australia signed a preliminary free-trade agreement earlier this week. In New Zealand, Xi reassured the media that there was no need to worry that the New Zealand market would be negatively impacted by the deal with Australia.

‘Worries that New Zealand does not have a market for its products in China are totally unnecessary,’ Xi told his audience in Wellington. ‘On the contrary, possibly New Zealand will have to worry about the fact that there is more Chinese demand than you can possibly supply.’

Picture: qqnews.com 

Shout-Out – November 21, 2014

 

President Xi Jinping is pictured here receiving a hongi, or traditional Maori welcome, from Lewis Moeau, a Maori elder in New Zealand.  Xi has visited both Australia and New Zealand over the last few days. China and Australia signed a preliminary free-trade agreement earlier this week. In New Zealand, Xi reassured the media that there was no need to worry that the New Zealand market would be negatively impacted by the deal with Australia.

‘Worries that New Zealand does not have a market for its products in China are totally unnecessary,’ Xi told media in Wellington. ‘On the contrary, possibly New Zealand will have to worry about the fact that there is more Chinese demand than you can possibly supply.’

Picture: qqnews.com 

Shout-Out – November 20, 2014

An elderly man tried to buy a train ticket with a banknote from before 1949. Ying, aged 80, seemed upset when his 71-year old bill was unable to buy him a ticket from Yongkang to Lishui in Zhejiang province. ‘It’s a 500 yuan bill! Why did the seller refuse to take it?’ he asked. The note he used had been printed in 1943, and bore the image of Sun Yat-sen. Since the People’s Republic of China was founded in 1949, pre-PRC banknotes have not been legal tender. While antique notes are no good for buying train tickets, they can sell for significant amounts on the collector’s market. Luckily Ying was able to buy a train ticket, as he was also carrying a 100 RMB note from after 1949.

Picture: bbc.com 

Shout-Out – November 19, 2014

More than 7,000 ten year visas to the US have been issued in Shanghai. The US Consulate General in Shanghai has reported that they might need to employ extra staff if the demand for the new visas continues. The Shanghai Daily reported that ten year visas do not mean the holder can stay in the USA for ten years; instead they are multiple entry visas valid for a ten year period, with the length of stay variable according to visa category. Despite the limitations on the visas, Max Baucus, the United States ambassador to China, said yesterday the visas were the ‘most important change in our consulate relationship with China’ in 35 years.

Picture: travel.state.gov 

Shout-Out – July 26, 2013

The Shanghai Expat Job Fair is back. Don’t miss your chance to connect with the top companies and latest opportunities in Shanghai. There will be hundreds of jobs available in many fields from engineering to media and design. Companies at our job fair will include Recticel Automotive, Pacific Prime, our premium sponsors Walt Disney,  and many more.  The second Shanghai Expat Job Fair will take place at the Shanghai Centre on Saturday August 31st from 10 am  to 4 pm.  Entrance is free if you RSVP here. Otherwise it’s 20 RMB at the door. Over 2,500 people flocked to our last job fair, which was featured on ICS News.

Shout-Out, July 25, 2013

Shanghai is catching up with Hong Kong in the cost-of-living leagues. Shanghai is now ranked as the 14th most expensive city for expats worldwide. That means Shanghai is 8 places behind Hong Kong, which is ranked 6th most expensive. The capital of Angola, Luanda, topped the league. The reason for the African city’s high ranking is the high cost of imported goods favoured by expats. It seems like Shanghai’s not the only city where there’s a wide gap between local prices and imported products. Mercer, the US-based human resources company which conducted the survey, published their findings yesterday.

Shout-Out – July 24, 2013

Shanghai United Family Hospital is expanding. They’ve announced another clinic opening in Shanghai. The new clinic will open on 8 Quankou Road in the Changning District. The new facility includes an Eye Clinic, a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic, a Dermatology and Skin Center, a Mental Health Clinic, an ENT (Ear, Nose and Throat) Clinic, and a Dental Clinic. ‘We are pleased to expand our world-class services to meet growing demand from our patients in the Shanghai region,’ said Emery Brautigan, Vice President of United Family Healthcare and regional General Manager in Shanghai.

Shout-Out – July 23, 2013

Geese police have been added to Xinjiang’s crime-fighting force. The birds were described as ‘more useful than dogs,’ and ‘very brave’ by a local police chief in Xinjiang province. One advantage of geese over dogs is that they are less easy to dispatch with drugs. While a dog  can be thrown a spiked treat, geese are usually in groups and have bad eyesight that might prevent them from seeing any food they are given. In June, a man in Shawan, Xinjiang drugged two dogs at night and climbed a police station wall, hoping to steal a motorbike. Before he could ride to freedom, a gaggle of geese blocked his path. After hearing the noise and commotion, a policeman woke up and caught the thief.

Shout-Out – July 22, 2013

The Happy Valley wasn’t so happy on Sunday afternoon, as a roller coaster was stuck above ground . Twenty-four people were left hanging for three minutes; the roller coaster was about twenty metres off the ground when the incident happened. No injuries were reported but people were said to be scared. The roller coaster, called Fireball, was China’s first wooden roller coaster. The roller coaster was thought to have stopped because of a brake sensor system malfunction. After a few trial runs for safety, the ride was opened to the public again.